Collection: Tomato Seeds (Heirloom)

There's no going back to store-bought tomatoes after you've tried a homegrown heirloom tomato. The notion of fresh salsas, tomato sandwiches, and cherry tomatoes off the vine gets us gardeners through the gloomy winter days. Planting and harvesting these heat-loving, vining annuals is a lot of fun. Eden Brothers offers over 50 heirloom tomato types, some of which are heritage and others which are open-pollinated and all of which are wonderful. Why not put some of them to the test this season?

Planting the best heirloom tomato seeds

  • 50+ heirloom tomato seed varieties
  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Offering both determinate and indeterminate varieties
  • Heirloom warm season vegetables with delicious, delectable flavor

Planting the best heirloom tomato seeds

  • 50+ heirloom tomato seed varieties
  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Offering both determinate and indeterminate varieties
  • Heirloom warm season vegetables with delicious, delectable flavor

Get the best flavor from heirloom tomatoes

Is it possible to have too many tomato plants? Obviously not. Slicers, beefsteak, cherry, and paste tomatoes all have their specific purpose in the kitchen (and in our mouths). When there are over 50 heirloom tomato varieties to select from, there's no reason to cut back on the tomato crop! With Eden Brothers' selection of heirloom tomato seeds, you'll be able to freeze, can, pickle, and salsa your way through the garden this summer.

How to grow heirloom tomato plants

Tomatoes, like eggplants, peppers, and potatoes, are heat-loving annuals of the Nightshade family. While tomato plants are by far the most popular veggies on the planet, the leaves can be slightly hazardous, therefore use gloves while touching them. Heirloom tomatoes should be planted inside four to six weeks before the last frost date, or direct sow or transplant seedlings outside two weeks after the last frost date. Sow tomato seeds in pairs, approximately two feet apart, in well-draining soil in a location with plenty of light. Plant herbs like parsley or basil with heirloom tomatoes to help keep pests at bay. Because tomatoes are susceptible to cold, cover them with row cover or plastic if you encounter a cold spell after they've been planted.

Different Heirloom Tomato Types Explained

Tomatoes are divided into two types: bushy and vining. Determined plants are bushy, while indeterminate plants are vining. While indeterminate plants will continue to grow up (or down), both determinate and indeterminate tomato plants will provide you with tomatoes throughout the summer! If you're growing indeterminate types, trellis the plants and clip the bottom leaves on a regular basis. Because tomatoes are prone to blight, allow them plenty of room to breathe and keep air moving through the row, especially if you're growing them in a greenhouse or hoop house. Harvest your heirloom tomatoes when they are completely colored for the ripest tomatoes, or when they are halfway green to keep tomatoes for a few days longer.

Health Benefits of Heirloom Tomatoes

Tomatoes are not only delicious, but they're also packed with nutrients. Heirloom tomatoes are high in antioxidants, as well as vitamins C, potassium, folate, and K.

Nothing beats a fresh-picked cherry tomato from your own garden. Heirloom tomatoes are a traditional garden food for a reason, and there are plenty of heritage and open-pollinated types in a variety of shapes and colors to suit every culinary demand or palate. Eden Brothers provides a wide selection of tomatoes, whether you're searching for a slicer or a cherry tomato. From Beefsteak to Mortgage Lifter to Roma to Small Red Cherry, there's something for everyone. Why don't you plant them all this year?

For more information about planting, growing, and harvesting heirloom tomato seeds, see the Tomato Seeds Planting Guide.