Collection: Squash Seeds (Heirloom)

Heirloom squash is a favorite of both new and experienced gardeners. Squash is a fixture in many gardens since it's easy to grow and harvest, but it's also the most prolific plant in the garden. Summer squashes, such as Black Beauty and Summer Golden Crookneck, are wonderful cooked or raw! Plant a couple winter types as well—Waltham Butternut produces a great soup, and Vegetable Spaghetti will trick even the most picky eaters!

Growing heirloom squash in your garden

  • 20 heirloom squash seed varieties
  • Top performers in AAS trials
  • Squash is quick growing and offers a high-yield
  • A delicious and versatile warm season vegetable

Growing heirloom squash in your garden

  • 20 heirloom squash seed varieties
  • Top performers in AAS trials
  • Squash is quick growing and offers a high-yield
  • A delicious and versatile warm season vegetable

The best heirloom squash for growing and cooking

There are several recipes for zucchini bread, zucchini noodles, zucchini chips, squash soup, and spaghetti squash to help bring this prolific garden veggie back to life.

Heirloom squash is classified as either summer or winter, depending on when it is harvested and how long it can be stored. Summer squash has a thin skin and is best eaten fresh, however it may be stored in the fridge for weeks. Winter squash, like pumpkins and onions, requires curing and may be stored for months. Squash is a pleasant vegetable to include in your daily diet for gut and skin health, since it is high in vitamins A and C, as well as antioxidants, water, and fiber.

Heirloom squash develops in the same way whether it's a summer or winter type. Squash plants are native to North America and belong to the gourd family. In locations with warm weather and full sun, squash is a robust plant that will produce innumerable fruits until the first frost.

Heirloom squash planting information

Summer squash types are bushy, which means that the plants are determinate and don't grow very far vertically while yet producing several fruits on the same plant. Varieties of winter squash are the vining kind. These indeterminate plants can spread up to 20 feet from their starting point, leaving a trail of gourds in its wake.

Does this imply that growing squash requires acres of land? Certainly not. In container gardens or raised beds, both summer and winter squash thrive. If the fruits are tiny, vertical trellising may benefit some winter squash varieties.

To gain a head start on the growing season, start both summer and winter squash inside. Once the risk of frost has gone, heirloom squash seeds can be directly spread in mounds. Heirloom squash plants thrive in full light and nutrient-rich soil, and they benefit from fertilizer and deep watering on a regular basis. Summer squash seeds or seedlings should be spaced every six inches, while winter squash seedlings should be spaced around three feet apart.

Choose from a huge variety of heirloom squash

Eden Brothers is sure to offer a variety of squash that you'll find you can't live without, whether you prefer Dark Green Zucchini or Acorn Table Queen.

For more information about planting, growing, and harvesting heirloom squash seeds, see the Squash Seeds Planting Guide.