Collection: Radish Seeds (Heirloom)

Radishes, which are crunchy, crispy, and somewhat peppery, seldom make it out of the garden, instead serving as a refreshing mid-weeding snack. Heirloom radishes are a cool-season root crop that can be grown in almost any zone. Radishes come in a variety of colors, including crimson, pink, white, black, and multicolored, and no two are alike. You should try all three types of heirloom radishes available from Eden Brothers.

Planting the best radish seeds in your garden

  • 11 radish seed varieties
  • Top performers in AAS trials
  • Easy to grow and fast-growing
  • Spice up any dish with their mild peppery and delicious flavor

Planting the best radish seeds in your garden

  • 11 radish seed varieties
  • Top performers in AAS trials
  • Easy to grow and fast-growing
  • Spice up any dish with their mild peppery and delicious flavor

The Best Heirloom Radishes are Homegrown

Hopefully, the first radish you nibbled into was fresh from the garden, since store-bought radishes just can't compare. These small root vegetables are so sensitive to their growing environment that they develop distinct flavor profiles depending on how hot it gets, how much water they get, and how long they spend in the soil.

Heirloom radishes are an easy-to-grow, cool-season root crop that comes in a range of colors and tastes. They're also one of the garden's fastest-maturing vegetables. Radishes can be harvested in as little as three weeks after seeding, depending on the variety. Heirloom radishes are divided into two categories. Spring radishes, such as Cherry Belle, grow swiftly and must be harvested often, but winter radishes, such as Japanese Minowase Daikon, grow more slowly and may be left in the ground for extended periods of time. In any case, you can't have too many radishes in your garden—these beauties fit in virtually everywhere, and you’re guaranteed to find a home for them all.

How to plant and grow heirloom radish seeds

Heirloom radishes thrive when planted directly in the garden. Use a walk-behind seeder to multi-sow the seeds in straight rows, and be sure to cover them with a half-inch of dirt and water them in. If you stay ahead of the weeds and keep an eye out for pests, you'll have plenty of radishes to enjoy. There's scarcely a more adaptable root vegetable than the simple radish, which may be eaten raw, sliced in salads, or baked in the oven. For a continual crop, buy extra heirloom radish seed and start a new planting every 10 days!

Health Benefits of Heirloom Radishes

Radishes are high in antioxidants and Vitamin C, which help to decrease blood sugar, purify the liver, and promote blood circulation and cardiovascular health. Radishes have become a popular vegetable farmed for microgreens due to their numerous health advantages. Heirloom radishes aren't just beneficial for you; they're also an excellent companion crop for carrots and parsnips in the yard. Radish root bulbs loosen the soil as they grow and are ready to harvest at the same time that other root groups require more space to expand. For this reason, many farmers utilize radishes as an autumn cover crop.

Heirloom Radishes as Microgreens

Eden Brothers has you covered whether you need spring radishes for salads or fall radishes for a cover crop (or both plus year-round microgreen harvests). Purchase by the packet, pound, or in bulk! For wholesale pricing on large-scale plantings, please contact us.

For more information about planting, growing, and harvesting heirloom radish seeds, see the Radish Seeds Planting Guide.