Collection: Primrose Seeds (Heirloom)

Look no further if you're seeking a tough, drought-tolerant native plant for your garden! Heirloom primrose seeds have satin-like petals that bloom from spring through fall in colors of buttery yellow, light pink, and white. Eden Brothers' Evening Primrose, Pale Evening Primrose, and Showy Evening Primrose Seeds have a low, clumping growth habit as well as flowers that unfold in the evening, making them a valuable supply of nectar for night foragers.

About our heirloom primrose seeds

  • Easy to grow and fast-growing
  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Blooms grow in clusters on long stems, with up to 40 petals on each stem
  • Blooms range in colors of purple, blue, pink, white, orange, red, and yellow

About our heirloom primrose seeds

  • Easy to grow and fast-growing
  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Blooms grow in clusters on long stems, with up to 40 petals on each stem
  • Blooms range in colors of purple, blue, pink, white, orange, red, and yellow

Plant the best heirloom primrose for your spring garden

Primrose is derived from the Latin Primus rosa, which means "first rose," and is one of the first flowers to bloom in the spring garden. Primrose is native to North and Central America, where it can be seen in the wild as well as in charming gardens. Heirloom primrose seeds are perennial and bloom in the spring, summer, and fall in zones 4 to 9, depending on the cultivar. They feature buttery yellow, light pink, and white petals.

When to plant heirloom primrose seeds

Heirloom primrose seeds can be planted directly in the yard or grown from seed inside. Direct sow the seed in late fall if you live somewhere with moderate winters, or in the spring if you live somewhere with harsher winters. After the risk of frost has gone and soil temperatures are approximately 60°F, start seeds indoors eight to ten weeks before planting outside. Heirloom primrose seeds sprout in about three weeks in consistently wet potting soil at temperatures between 65 and 75°F. Seeds require darkness to break dormancy, so sow them on the soil's surface and cover with a thin layer of vermiculite.

Transplanting heirloom primrose to your garden

Germination rates will be improved by maintaining high humidity and consistent temperatures. Use a humidity dome or plastic wrap to cover your seed-starting container and spray it often. Once 10 to 15% of the seeds have germinated, remove the cover and spray periodically until the majority of the seeds have germinated. Plants should be potted into larger pots after they have three sets of true leaves, such as plastic cell packs or old single-serving yogurt containers. Plants should be hardened off for a week before being transplanted into the garden.

Plant your heirloom primrose transplants at a six-inch spacing in the garden. These plants have delicate roots, and if they become rootbound, they may become stunted. Primrose thrives on sandy soils and can withstand drought, but it needs adequate levels of rain to thrive. They flourish in a wide range of conditions, from full sun to partial shade. Overheating throughout the summer may deter them from returning the next year. Heirloom primrose also thrives in well-drained pots.

Maintaining healthy heirloom primrose plants

The root system of heirloom primrose plants allows them to expand and self-seed each year. Each spring, thin the plants to six inches and treat with a well-balanced fertilizer or rich compost. Deadheading and clearing off wasted foliage can help the plant blossom longer and is helpful for its overall health.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom primrose seeds, see the Primrose Seeds Planting Guide.