Collection: Gilia Seeds (heirloom)

Heirloom gilia seeds are a drought tolerant type that are native to temperate and tropical parts of the Americas. They are mainly found in desert or semi-arid settings. They are the ideal partner flower because of their modest, delicate size, which does not overshadow other plants. The phlox family includes both Gilia capitata and Gilia tricolor. They will reward their gardener with gorgeous bluish lavender blossoms in exchange for growing them in sandy, rocky soil.

Growing heirloom gilia in your garden

  • Pollinator attractor
  • Member of the phlox family
  • Offers beautiful blueish, lavender blooms
  • Many medicinal uses

Growing heirloom gilia in your garden

  • Pollinator attractor
  • Member of the phlox family
  • Offers beautiful blueish, lavender blooms
  • Many medicinal uses

Heirloom gilia, botanically known as Gilia capitata and sometimes known as "thimble flower," is a genus of flowering plants related to phlox that includes between 25 and 50 species. It belongs to the polemoniaceae family.

On sturdy, long stalks, this lovely and unusual wildflower native to western North America blooms with exquisite clusters of pale blue flowers. Heirloom gilia is a one-of-a-kind bloom that should be featured in any wildflower or ornamental garden! It is adaptable to sun or partial shade situations. The delightful perfume these flowers produce each blooming season will quickly grow on you and pollinators alike.

Your heirloom gilia blossoms should reach a height of four inches to two feet and a spread to about eight to nine inches. This easy-to-grow annual is ideal for novices as well as experienced gardeners.

Direct sow your seeds two to three weeks before the last frost, or cold stratify seeds inside for 30 days and sow after the threat of frost has passed to create your own heirloom gilia blossoms. Gilia thrives in full sun and well-draining soil.

Spread heirloom gilia seeds on the earth's surface, gently compressing them without covering them with dirt. Once established, these seeds require very little attention. After seeding, it will take 14 to 21 days for the seeds to germinate. From December through May, plant extra seeds around every two to three weeks to lengthen your blooming season. Heirloom gilia is an annual that dies back after the first deadly frost. Cut down your plants and clean any waste to make room for new plantings in the spring.

California poppy and clarkia are all good companion plants for heirloom gilia. We also recommend growing these lovely flowers near your veggie garden to attract pollinators like bees and hummingbirds. Gravel and rock gardens, cottage gardens, butterfly gardens, beds and borders, and meadows will all benefit from these blooms. Heirloom gilia is also a great choice for container gardening and gives gorgeous cut blooms!

For this specific variety, check out Eden Brothers' Heirloom Globe Gilia Seeds. We also offer Gilia tricolor seeds, also known as Heirloom Birds Eyes Seeds.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom gilia flower seed, see the Globe Gilia Seeds Planting Guide.