Collection: Chives Seeds (Heirloom)

Heirloom chives, which reach a height of 10 to 12 inches, are taller than grass and have thicker leaves with a hollow and pointed shape that grow straight and upward. They are related to onions, leeks, and garlic. Both heirloom common (onion) chives and heirloom garlic chives seeds produce lovely pink and purple flowers, however if these blooms are clipped off as buds, they will grow additional leaves.

Growing heirloom chives in your garden

  • Prefers full sun exposure
  • Versatile herb growing both indoors or outdoors
  • Delicious flavor
  • Hung in the home to ward off evil and disease, according to folklore

Growing heirloom chives in your garden

  • Prefers full sun exposure
  • Versatile herb growing both indoors or outdoors
  • Delicious flavor
  • Hung in the home to ward off evil and disease, according to folklore

Grow the best heirloom chives in your home garden

Heirloom chives grow nicely in containers and beds, and they're a great addition to your herb and flower gardens. The Balkans, which include Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, and areas of southwestern Russia, are home to this herb. Heirloom chives require very little attention other than water and a bright, sunny setting, whether indoors or out. They will return each spring as perennials, and you may need to divide the clumps and give them to friends or continue to plant them in other parts of your garden after three to four years.

How to plant heirloom chives

If sowing seeds outside, wait until the threat of frost has passed. Choose a healthy, loamy soil, but don't over-fertilize, as this will result in milder-flavored heirloom chives. Heirloom chives thrive in soil that is 60 to 70°F. Plant in rows with groups of seeds every four inches, or spread seeds over the soil's surface and compact them. Seeds need direct sunlight to germinate, so don't cover them with soil. In around 10 to 14 days, sprouts will appear. Plants should be thinned to one plant every four inches once they reach a height of two inches.

When to harvest and enjoy heirloom chives

Simply snip off what you need once the heirloom chives are around 12 inches tall. Without inflicting any harm, you can clip heirloom chives down to roughly half their height. The flowers of your heirloom chive plant can be eaten as well, when they bloom.

Heirloom chives are high in calcium, iron, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, among other nutrients. These vitamins aid in the growth of blood cells, the regulation of blood pressure, and the strengthening of immunity. Additionally, heirloom chives contain choline and folate, both of which have been associated with memory enhancement.

Cooking with Heirloom Chives

Heirloom chives have a plethora of culinary possibilities. Stocks, soups, salads, potato dishes, quiches, eggs, and even olive oils can all gain from heirloom chives. Whatever you do with your homegrown heirloom chives, make sure to add them at the end of the cooking process, as heirloom chives lose their flavor when heated.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom chives seed, see the Chives Seeds Planting Guide.