Collection: Calendula Seeds (Heirloom)

Heirloom calendulas, often known as Pot Marigolds, are a prolific and easy-to-grow annual flower. On lengthy stems, shades of gold break forth, making this a beautiful cut flower variety. Eden Brothers' Geisha Girl Calendula Seeds, Pink Surprise Calendula Seeds, Pacific Beauty Yellow Calendula Seeds, and Nova Calendula Seeds are just a few of the numerous varieties available to bring this ray of golden blooms to your garden.

What we love about planting calendula seeds

  • 8 heirloom calendula seed varieties
  • Spring-planted prolific bloomer
  • Pollinator attractor
  • Offers both culinary and medicinal uses

What we love about planting calendula seeds

  • 8 heirloom calendula seed varieties
  • Spring-planted prolific bloomer
  • Pollinator attractor
  • Offers both culinary and medicinal uses

The best selection of heirloom calendula

Heirloom calendula, often known as an ornamental marigold, adds a splash of color and depth to any flower bed or garden. This easy-to-grow, pollinator-friendly flower prefers full sun and is well-known for its profuse bloom. Calendula gets its name from the Latin word calends, which means "throughout the months," hence the English word calendar. These heirloom blossoms are native to Eurasia and North Africa, and they make excellent selections for beds, borders, rock gardens, mass plantings, and even vegetable and herb gardens!

How to grow your own heirloom calendula

Start your heirloom calendula seeds six to eight weeks before the last frost date or sow them straight in the garden right before the last frost date. Select a planting location that has average, somewhat fertile, well-drained soil that receives full sun exposure. In hot summer climates, light shade can be tolerated. Spread a 1/4 inch layer of soil on top of the seeds, spacing them about eight to ten inches apart. Mist the seeds until they are damp to the top 1/2 inch. Keep established plants wet and add compost around the base. Pinching back young plants encourages compact, bushy growth. To stimulate additional growth, deadhead your blossoms and pick flowers.

The many wonderful uses of heirloom calendula

Heirloom calendula flowers and leaves can be used in soups, salads, and rice dishes. Calendula has been used medicinally since at least the twelfth century, in addition to its culinary uses. Antiviral, anticancer, antibacterial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties are all found in heirloom calendula. Muscle spasms can be prevented, fevers can be reduced, sore throats and mouths can be treated, menstrual cramps can be relieved, and stomach ulcers can be treated using this flower. Calendula tea is a popular way to get the various benefits of the flower. For a sore mouth and/or throat, steep dried heirloom calendula in boiling water for 10 to 20 minutes before drinking or use as a mouth rinse. Heirloom calendula is also used as a simple extract, an oil, or a cream in some cases.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom calendula flower seed, see the Calendula Seeds Planting Guide.