Collection: Sage (Broadleaf) Seeds (Heirloom)

For the perennial herb garden, sage seeds (also known as Broadleaf sage) are a must-have. Seasoning chicken, vegetables, sausages, pastas, and squash with the leaves of this fragrant herb is popular. Heirloom sage is a hardy herb that blooms in the late summer/early fall with light and brilliantly colored purple blossoms. Sage blossoms attract pollinators and may be added to salads or used as decorations to offer a delicious flash of color to foods!

All about our heirloom sage seeds

  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Culinary, fragrance, medicinal, and ornamental uses
  • Extremely flavorful and versatile
  • Can be planted indoors or outdoors

All about our heirloom sage seeds

  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Culinary, fragrance, medicinal, and ornamental uses
  • Extremely flavorful and versatile
  • Can be planted indoors or outdoors

Seeds of sage (broadleaf) are one of the most simple and rewarding perennial herbs to produce. Although it is native to the Mediterranean and north Africa, it has been naturalized and may now be seen growing wild throughout the US coast. Salvia officinalis, sometimes known as culinary sage, is a standout spice in many fall meals, with edible leaves and blooms. In zones 5 through 8, heirloom sage seeds may be sown in the spring or fall and will overwinter.

After the risk of frost has gone, heirloom sage seeds can be planted directly in the garden. Sage can be difficult to direct sow since it takes up to six weeks to germinate in low conditions. It's critical to keep the soil wet at this period. Six to eight weeks before the final frost, sage seeds can instead be planted inside. They sprout in about three weeks and thrive in consistently moist potting soil at temperatures between 65 and 75°F. Sow seeds 1/8 inch below the earth's surface and cover with dirt. Plants should be potted into larger containers after they have three sets of genuine leaves. Plants should be hardened off for a week before being transplanted into the garden.

Heirloom sage thrives in medium to full sun, but it may also be grown in pots or indoors if placed near a sunny window that receives at least six hours of direct sunlight every day. Outdoor sage plants mature into a spherical bush-like form that grows one to two feet tall, bushing out as they mature. Plants should be spaced around 24 inches apart. Within two to three years, these plants will attain full growth. Heirloom s age is drought-tolerant once established, as long as adequate water is provided throughout the establishment period. Sage should not be overwatered. Watering should be done thoroughly, but only when the soil is almost entirely dry, as with most Mediterranean plants.

Sage is a low-maintenance plant that works well not just in herb gardens but also as a decorative shrub in landscapes. Early in the spring, it should be trimmed back, reducing woody stems to foster new leaf growth for the next season. Heirloom sage leaves can be used as desired for cooking, but they should only be gathered once or twice every growing season. When harvesting the entire plant, just trim approximately half of the height back to allow it to continue growing. Sage leaves can be dried on a drying screen or hung in a warm area away from direct sunlight in a warm, dark environment with sufficient ventilation.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom sage seed, see the Sage (Broadleaf) Seeds Planting Guide.