Collection: Beet Seeds (Heirloom)

Famous for their color, heirloom beet seeds will produce an entirely edible vegetable. Beets were traditionally grown for their bulbous root, however, all parts of the beet plant can be eaten and enjoyed. Tender beet greens can begin being harvested when thinning a row of beets. Then, as the remaining beet plants mature, the leafy portion can be boiled or steamed, with a similar taste and texture to spinach. The beet root itself can be enjoyed in a variety of culinary fashions.

Growing heirloom beets in your garden

  • Leaves and roots of beets are packed with nutrition
  • Cool season vegetables that can survive frost and almost freezing temperatures
  • Benefit from both the roots and the greens
  • Prefers full sun

    Growing heirloom beets in your garden

    • Leaves and roots of beets are packed with nutrition
    • Cool season vegetables that can survive frost and almost freezing temperatures
    • Benefit from both the roots and the greens
    • Prefers full sun

    Choose from the best selection of Heirloom Beets

    Beetroot, often known as "beets" in North America, are completely edible vegetables that can be eaten from the roots to the leaves. Heirloom beets have a long history of popularity. They were domesticated in the ancient Middle East, and Ancient Egyptians, Romans, and Greeks grew them. Beetroot has been used as a remedy for a variety of digestive and blood disorders since the Middle Ages. Beetroot is also used as a natural dye because of the strong stain it leaves. In the nineteenth century, it was also used to tint wine.

    Cooking with heirloom beets

    Heirloom beets can be prepared in a number of different ways. Beets are commonly prepared via boiling, roasting, steaming, and even juicing. Borscht, a beet soup, is highly popular in Eastern Europe. Burachky is a meal made from beets and horseradish that is commonly served in sandwiches or with meat and potatoes in Ukraine and Poland. Spiced beet is a common side dish in Indian cuisine

    Recommendations for growing heirloom beets

    There are a few things to keep in mind while planting heirloom beets in your garden to ensure success. Beets should not be planted in close proximity to Swiss chard or spinach because they are related. To keep competition at bay, keep plots well-weeded. Another factor to consider while choosing a place is that beets tolerate low fertility soil well. In fact, too much nitrogen might promote top growth at the expense of root development.

    Plantings should be spaced about three weeks apart for a continuous harvest. Plant seeds 3/4 inch deep and one inch apart in rows that are 12 to 18 inches apart. Seedlings may need to be thinned once germination is complete and seedlings are roughly four to five inches tall. Thin small, cylindrical roots to three to four inches apart for early harvesting. Thin to six inches or more in spacing if you want longer roots and a later crop. Beets acquire their best flavor and color when grown in cool, sunny circumstances. They're usually picked 65 days after planting, when they're between one and a half to two inches tall.

    For more information about planting planting, growing, and caring for heirloom beets, see our Beet Seeds Planting Guide.