Collection: Gladiolus Bulbs

Sometimes called "sword lily", these spring-planted flower bulbs produce a profusion of spectacularly beautiful perennial flowers during early and mid-summer. Plant gladiolus bulbs in abundance in spring and enjoy a burst of color during the hot summer months. For non-stop color, check out Eden Brothers' Gladiolus Monet's Garden Mix or for more contrast, Gladiolus Black Star Bulbs, an almost black gladiolus that will add drama to your garden.

About our gladiolus bulbs

  • 15+ gladiolus bulb varieties
  • Also known as sword lily for their blade-like leaves
  • Easy to grow and maintain
  • Perfect for borders, containers, or as cut flowers

About our gladiolus bulbs

  • 15+ gladiolus bulb varieties
  • Also known as sword lily for their blade-like leaves
  • Easy to grow and maintain
  • Perfect for borders, containers, or as cut flowers

Learn to plant gladiolus bulbs for beautiful blooms

Gladiolus is a perennial favorite that comes back year after year. These flowers have become a great choice in the gardening industry thanks to their enormous, spikey, beautiful blossoms! Gladiolus is a member of the iris family, and its name originates from the Latin word gladius, which means "sword." Gladiolus is a flower that symbolizes remembrance and is supposed to communicate infatuation and love. Gladiolus are a terrific addition to any landscape, whether you're growing them for the meaning or the stunning visual splendor.

The best time to plant gladiolus bulbs

Plant your gladiolus bulbs in the spring, as soon as the soil is warm, about 55°F, around March or April. These blooms prefer full sun exposure but can handle some shade. Soil preference is rich, soft, and moist, with just a little fertilizer. Gladiolus do not do well in heavy, soggy soil. Plant your bulbs about four to six inches deep and six inches apart from each other. If you choose to buy in large quantities, be sure to stagger your planting to maintain a better succession of blooms. Add mulch to the planting site, about two to four inches, and routinely weed if needed. Gladiolus requires plenty of water, (if you get less than one inch of rain per week, you'll want to water regularly throughout the summer) but once these plants are established they need virtually no attention. These flowers will grow to be 48 to 60 inches tall, adding a gorgeous backdrop to any surrounding plants. Zinnias and dahlias make beautiful companion plants for gladiolus!

Gladiolus Blooms come back year after year

Remove spent blooms to encourage growth. Once all flowers on a stalk are gone, cut the stalk about two to three inches above the soil, being mindful to leave the plant intact so it can grow corms for the following season.

Temperate area-based gardeners can mulch gladiolus at the end of the season, while gardeners in colder areas will want to dig up and store the gladiolus bulbs each year. If you are in a colder area, lift the bulbs and snap the corms from the stems. Dry out the bulbs for a couple of weeks, then snap the new corms from the old, discarding the old. The new ones should be kept dry and cold until they are replanted.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for gladiolus bulbs, see the Gladiolus Bulb Planting Guide.