Collection: Dahlia Bulbs / Tubers

Is it a bulb? Is it a root? No, it's a tuber! Commonly referred to as "bulbs" Dahlia tubers store food for the growing season that cluster together at the bottom of a stem. Dahlia tubers can have several growing points called eyes, and can get bigger each year making more growing points. Dahlias are easy to grow, put on an amazing show all summer long, and we're proud to offer one of the largest selections anywhere!

What we love about dahlia bulbs

  • 50+ dahlia bulb varieties
  • Easy to grow perennials
  • Many colors, shapes, and sizes to choose from
  • Thrive and produce more in full sun

What we love about dahlia bulbs

  • 50+ dahlia bulb varieties
  • Easy to grow perennials
  • Many colors, shapes, and sizes to choose from
  • Thrive and produce more in full sun

Dahlia Bulbs Online

Named for the 18th century Swedish botanist Anders Dahl, these perennial beauties are as interesting as they are beautiful. Dahlias were named the national flower of Mexico in 1963. The aztecs grew tubers as a food crop, however, the practice died out after the Spanish Conquest. Due to an enormous growth in popularity in recent years, new dahlia cultivars are being introduced regularly and we're proud to offer one of the largest selection anywhere, from the enormous dinner plates such as the Break Out dahlia to the more unusual Cactus Dahlia such as Black Narcissus. Dahlias are a genus of tuberous, herbaceous perennial plants that are native to Central America and Mexico. As members of the compositae family of plants, they are relatives of daisies, zinnias, chrysanthemum, and sunflowers! Dahlias are octoploids, meaning they have eight sets of homologous chromosomes, whereas the average plant has but two.

Dahlia stems range in height from 12 inches to a towering six to eight feet! That said, the majority of species do not produce scented varieties. The bright, vibrant colors are the main attraction, with hues that cover the length of the color wheel.

Dahlia Bulb Planting and Care

When growing dahlias in your yard, there are a few things to keep in mind. Dahlias really prefer warm soil and should be planted in the warm and long days of spring. Typically, you would plant dahlias when you plant your vegetable patch. You can plant dahlias as late as mid-June in most parts of the country. When selecting a planting location, seek out an area with full sun (six hours or more a day). Dahlias thrive in full sun, but can tolerate some partial shade. A general rule is the more sun, the bigger the flowers, so plan accordingly. Try to choose a location that is sheltered from the wind. One of the most vital things when planting dahlias is to choose an area that is well-draining. Dahlias do not like soggy roots.

Once you have selected the perfect location for your tubers, dig a hole that is twice as wide and deep as the tuber. Place the tuber in the hole with the eye facing up. The eye is the point on the tuber from which the plant grows. If you plan to plant multiple dahlias in the same area, be sure to separate each one by about two feet. this practice will ensure that each tuber has proper space to grow. Shorter varieties can be planted closer together. Depending on the size of the variety, rows should be about three to five feet apart. Fill the holes with just enough soil to cover the top of the tuber. Once you see new growth appear, add more soil. Slowly covering the stem with soil will allow the stem to strengthen, thus supporting the flowers better. Young dahlias do not require a lot of water. larger plants should be watered if the rainfall is less than one inch in seven days. Remove any broken or damaged foliage.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for dahlias, see the Dahlia Bulbs Planting Guide.