Collection: Coneflower Seeds

Coneflower seeds, also known as echinacea where it has gained popularity in the herbal world, produce showy blooms on sturdy, upward stalks. These flowers are coarse, rough-hairy, herbaceous perennials and are unique for their petals that drape down and away from their conical center, offering up pollen to bees and butterflies passing by. Coneflowers are easy to grow, long-blooming, and they make beautiful cut flowers!

About our coneflower seeds

  • 5 coneflower seed varieties
  • Spring-blooming pollinator attractor
  • Drought resistant
  • Prefers full sun exposure

About our coneflower seeds

  • 5 coneflower seed varieties
  • Spring-blooming pollinator attractor
  • Drought resistant
  • Prefers full sun exposure

The Amazing Features of Coneflower

Coneflowers are a member of the daisy family and native to the United States. Plant this perennial to ensure nearby plants have plenty of pollination. Coneflowers are drought resistant and will thrive on the available moisture from rain except in extremely dry areas. You'll find it in wildflower mixes like Eden Brothers' All Perennial Wildflower Mix and The Bees Knees Wildflower Mix.

Coneflower Germination

Coneflower requires cold stratification prior to planting. Soak the seeds for one to two hours to achieve this. Drain the water with a paper towel and spread the seeds out in a single layer on the towel. Wrap a dry paper towel around the wet one and place everything in a sealed plastic bag to keep the seeds damp but not soggy. Refrigerate the bag for about eight to twelve weeks before the day you want to plant them. If your seeds sprout before the cold stratification process is through, remove them right away and plant them indoors until they are ready to be moved outside.

Sow your coneflower seeds in the late fall, after the frost, or you may choose to start your seeds indoors six to eight weeks before the final frost date. Coneflower perform best in average, well-drained soil with bright, sunny conditions, tolerating partial shade if needed. Broadcast sow the seeds directly onto the surface of the soil without covering, as coneflower requires sunlight to germinate.

tips for treating coneflower blooms

In areas with normal rainfall, additional watering is not necessary. Usually, coneflowers don't require fertilizer unless the flowers are small or not developing well. If this is the case, use a fertilizer high in phosphorus. When blooms begin to look spent, cut down the plants by a third of their height. This will help re-energize the plant as well as store energy for subsequent seasons. The coneflower plant itself will tend to grow larger if not cut back, however, it is not a species that spreads or takes over other plants nearby.

Coneflower is a great companion plant for bee balm, phlox, coreopsis, Black Eyed Susans, gayfeather, sage and catnip!

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for coneflower seed, see the Coneflower Seeds Planting Guide.